All articles

Medical Students concerned regarding lack of research skill teaching

Image credit: Bryan Jones

doi:10.7244/cmj-1373989392
F Cooksey, R Smith, TI Lemon, R Sharm, A Yarrow Jenkins, P Winter, A Buick

Knowledge of research skills and methods, once an integral part of the academic process, has in recent times become neglected by medical schools. Anecdotal evidence suggests political pressures have prioritised communication skills training as the focus towards producing the best doctors for tomorrow. Consequently, the prioritisation of communication training in the UK undergraduate curriculum has caused a reduction in research methods training, despite Tomorrows Doctors (2009) [1] documenting research skills such as critical appraisal integral to the analytical armoury of the developing clinician. We decided to poll students as to whether they felt they are adequately taught research skills and methods in their undergraduate medical courses.

Short-term vs Conventional Glucocorticoid Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of COPD

Image credit: Hey Paul Studios

doi:10.7244/cmj.2013.07.002
Christine Ma

Three hundred and fourteen patients >40 years old with >20 pack year history and diagnosed acute exacerbation of COPD in hospital were randomised to have either 5 or 14 days of systemic glucocorticoids. The primary end point of this study was the time to next exacerbation over a follow-up period of 6 months, and secondary end points examined all-cause mortality, changes in pulmonary function testing, clinical performance, glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. Apart from a higher cumulative glucocorticoid exposure in the 14 day therapy group, there were no statistical differences in primary or secondary outcome measures between the two groups.

'To Give or Not to Give'

Image credit: scribbletaylor

doi:10.7244/cmj.2013.07.001
Shannon Leckey, Thomas Lemon

In order to be passed, the draft bill must first be introduced into the assembly, go through all 4 stages of scrutiny and then be presented for Royal Assent. Ministers aim for the law to be in place by 2015.As medical students, we should all know about the legal regulations surrounding key aspects of medicine, The Welsh Government published the Draft Human Transplantation Act in June 2012 [1]. It proposes that Welsh residents give presumed consent for organ donation unless they ‘opt out’ of the system

CABG superior to PCI for diabetic patients with multi-vessel CAD

Image credit: Charlie J

doi:10.7244/cmj.2013.06.001
Clement Loh Chee Hoou

Coronary artery disease (CAD) affects millions worldwide. In North America, nearly 700,000 people are diagnosed with multi-vessel CAD and require immediate revascularisation and of these, 200,000 are diabetic. Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are the two main modalities of revascularisation. The previous BARI, CARDia, TAXUS and SYNTAX randomised clinical trials offered conclusive evidence favouring CABG over PCI as the preferred method of revascularisation (1).

Review of the Oxford Handbook of Medical Sciences

doi:10.7244/cmj-1348049146
Angus J McKnight

The iconic Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine has long been a favourite of medical students and junior doctors alike from all over the country. It is used routinely for reference, revision and help on the wards. The Oxford Handbooks series has greatly expanded over the last few years, and there are now handbooks dedicated to a vast number of medical and surgical specialties and subspecialties targeted at all levels of medical training.

Review of Clinical Biochemistry

doi:10.7244/cmj-1334679407
Stephanie Smith

Clinical Biochemistry is taken from Oxford’s new “Fundamentals of Biomedical Science” range. The authors set out to bridge the gaps between basic science, disease processes and diagnostic medicine. The book would be particularly useful for preclinical students who wish to gain a better insight into the relevance of biochemistry in a clinical context.

Review of OGPL Child Health

doi:10.7244/cmj-1326576817
Catharine Ward

OGPL Child Health is a publication of the Oxford Handbook (OHB) range written predominantly for GPs and other primary health care professionals who have to manage paediatric patients. It covers the majority of common conditions and presentations on a systematic basis with a view to diagnosis and management within the community.

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