All articles

Expression of Soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 in Colorectal Cancer and Potential Use as Treatment Response Index

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.12.001
Anastasios Koutsoumourakis, Olga Giouleme

It has been previously demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between serum concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1) with stage of colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and metastases. The present study was performed primarily to examine whether sICAM-1 levels are indeed affected by chemotherapy treatment in patients with metastatic CRC and secondly to examine whether such values can be used compared to CEA as a more reliable alternative treatment indices for patient monitoring with metastatic CRC during systemic chemotherapy.

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The Aneuploidy Conundrum

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.10.001
Sarah Adams

Cancer is characterised by its capacity for over-proliferation. Aneuploidy, meanwhile, has long been associated with a decreased rate of cell proliferation in untransformed cells and yet also predisposes to cancer. The paradoxical nature of these findings has meant that the role of aneuploidy in cancer remains hotly debated.

The Cambridge Medicine Journal’s guide to summer research projects

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.09.002
Benjamin Beresford-Jones

Cambridge summers are long, and this provides the perfect opportunity to organise a research project. Research projects offer crucial insights into the world of academic science that can’t be attained from the medical course – they can also be helpful later in your career, as the experience helps in MB/PhD and Academic Fellowship applications, and research publications and posters can gain points when applying to hospitals for Foundation Year programmes.

Tongue-tied: Management in Pierre Robin Sequence

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.09.001
Nikita Rajaraman Rajaraman, Elvino Barreto

An 18-month-old male with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS) presented to A&E with airway obstruction and hypoxia due to retroglossoptosis. The patient was resuscitated immediately and intubated. Gold standard treatment was surgical management by mandibular distraction osteogenesis. However, as the patient was unable to afford the surgery, a simpler and cheaper surgical technique had to be employed. The procedure involved pulling the base of the tongue anteriorly and tying to the hyoid bone. This maintained airway patency and patient was extubated. Mother was given feeding and positioning advice for the child. It is expected that the mandibular growth will eventually catch up with the tongue growth.

Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Diet: the Present and the Future

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.08.001
Irene Mateos Rodriguez

The frequent presence of gastrointestinal problems in Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has led to attempts to understand how gastrointestinal disturbances relate to behaviour, and how modifying diets may help to modify behaviour. This review paper aims to summarise the rationale for managing symptoms of ASD through diet, the current status of research on diet and ASD, and the future of employing this approach to manage ASD.

The contribution of psychology to our present understanding of schizophrenia

doi:10.7244/cmj.2017.07.004
Marta Isibor

Schizophrenia can be described in two ways. One perspective is a life-long devastating brain disease whereas the alternative is a distress resulting from difficult experiences which can be often successfully managed. The difference in the mere definition is not banal as it illuminates deeper discrepancies in current approaches to mental health.

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